The power of connections

I am trying to increase my blog output and write a new post every week, aiming to publish on a Sunday evening/ Monday morning. I had a great response to my last post, so thank you to everyone who commented, liked and shared. Good news is that the Purple Wings Calendars are now available from here.

I was going to write in more detail about the Purple Wings Conference and Ball, and I do want to record the Purple Wings poem I wrote, however Rachel Jury AKA Rocking Two Stomas has done a great summary of the event on her blog – so I thought I wouldn’t try to recreate something that has already been done. Rachel gave a great speech at the conference, and it was lovely to see how much her confidence had grown from last year when she was part of the team speaking about the IBD & Ostomy Support Show.

What I did think about coming away from the event is how great and empowering it is to be in a room with so many other people with stomas and IBD. I’ve been asked a few times what would I suggest to someone newly diagnosed, and never really had a clear piece of practical advice – I always told people to ;remember that everyone’s disease is different’. Now I do have practical advice – connect with other people.

This could be done in a variety of ways.

1. Online

There are loads of Facebook groups, blogs and social media accounts of people with IBD and ostomies. There is also a whole raft of similar for chronic illness generally. Because there are so many, there are many different styles and types of content – some groups are very chatty, others are more focused on advice and support. I used to be a bit scathing of the chatty ones until I was in hospital over a hundred miles from home and couldn’t sleep.

Some of the groups are very busy, and posts can be missed, so do persevere. I am a member of many, but not that active at the moment.

You also need to be wary of anyone offering cures or advice that goes beyond ‘this helped me’ – and always consuklt with your medical team, or an emergency medical professional, before stopping nay treatment you are recieving.

I have made some really good connections and friendships that started online.

2. Support Groups

In the UK, the major (and some independent) charities and organisations run support groups. These might be organised via your hospital. They offer an opportunity to come together and meet other people with the same condition and talk to them, or hear from an expert in the field.

Crohn’s & Colitis UK, the ia (ileostomy association) and Colostomy UK all have local networks or groups operating around the country.

I previously coordinated my local Crohn’s & Colitis UK network, and it was great to be able to have discussions with other patients. Some meet in pubs, some in coffee shops, some at hospitals – it will vary depending on the local volunteers, but it is rewarding stuff.

3. Big events

Periodically, a big event, such as a conference or ball will come along. Things like the Crohn’s & Colitis UK AGM, The Purple Wings Ball or the GetYourBellyOut ball. Because these events tend to be longer in duration, you get more of a chance to speak to more people, and hear some inspiring stories of how people deal with there disease or bag.

4. Make a friend

I have some people who I would class as friends who have IBD and/ or a stoma. I work with one of them, which is helpful if you just need a bit of undertsanding, or at least informed sympathy. If you can, it is worth doing – lots of people are happ to talk and share. Remember though they too are chronically ill, so they might not be able to support you all the time.

 

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